Senan Of Somerset

My Path

Kintsugi

The weather here in the UK seems to have finally broken with some colder and wetter weather…

The changing seasons can make you happy or sad. The summer is over, the trees are shutting down in preparation for the winter and shedding their leaves. On the lighter side, the autumn colours are coming and will no doubt be spectacular. And of course here in Somerset there is the apple harvest and a certain fermented version of the apple juice that we all enjoy so much. Here it is widely considered to be one your “five a day…”

That said, I do find that the boarders, hedgerows and flowerbeds now look a little bedraggled, sad and somewhat broken.

Which brings me to my title “Kintsugi”. A Japanese word used to describe the art form that is; broken pottery that has been restored. It is a stunning art, where a broken pot, cup, vessel has not only been mended but the mends are often accentuated with gold. Often repairs in our western culture are thought to be good when you “can’t see the join”. Kintsugi actually does the opposite. In essence it is a celebration of all that has been broken and restored.

So often in my path I have met great people of faith. But often they have come from places of great “brokenness”. They are often not a case of “you can’t see the join”. In stead they show great and deep scars that are now inlaid with the gold from the healing of the Cross – the greatest symbol of brokenness of all time.

At this point I would normally download a pile of images from the internet for you to look over. But I decided not. Instead can I recommend you put “kintsugi” into your search engine and select images… then have a browse and see if an image selects you?

So if you are feeling a little broken and bedraggled as the autumn season arrives, maybe spend some time with the pictures, celebrating the beauty of this art form.

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